Yobs are Lincoln’s biggest problem

Lincolnshire Police recognised that anti-social behaviour is a big problem in Lincoln, after a national report criticised that police are slow to tackle the issue.

The report claims police have given up on the street and are failing to take problems caused by anti-social behaviour, as officers do not regard it as real crime.

In Lincoln, the situation is no different. Over 4,000 cases of anti-social behaviour have already been recorded from January to August this year.

Out of all types of crime in the city, anti-social behaviour (ASB) is by far the most widespread crime, according to CrimeMapper figures from Lincolnshire Police.

In the first eight months of 2010, the most ASB cases were recorded in the Abbey area of Lincoln (1,017), followed by Park (795), and Carholme (605).

ASB cases are however decreasing in some areas in comparison to the same period last year, on average by 10.5%.

The only areas in Lincoln to record increases in anti-social behaviour are Abbey (14%), Glebe (2.6%), and Minster (5.9%).

Addressing the issue

More police patrols on the streets are thought to be a solution to reducing anti-social behaviour.

“We do accept that there is still much for us to do,” said Keith Smy, Assistant Chief Constable at Lincolnshire Police.

“We recognise that not every incident of ASB is reported to the police and that this might distort the actual experiences on the ground.”

Smy, who leads the force response to tackling ASB, said they have been working with local district and county council partners on a joint initiative.

To tackle ASB, Chief Inspector of Constabulary Sir Denis O’Connor said he wanted more “feet on the street”.

He also said neighbourhood officers should be tackling and monitoring low-level crime in a way that does not create a ”sea of bureaucracy”.

Photos: Lincolnshire Police (main photo is staged courtesy of Lincolnshire Police cadets)

The Lincolnite welcomes your comments: Have you witnessed or been a victim of anti-social behaviour in Lincoln? How could ASB be tackled better?