Harbour Master restaurant conversion goes ahead

— Update: Plans to transform the Harbour Master’s Office into a new structure have been approved by the City of Lincoln Council’s Planning Committee on October 24.

Plans to redevelop the decaying Harbour Master’s Office on Brayford Wharf North will go through the City Council’s Planning Committee on October 24.

As previously reported, the two-storey structure is owned by The Brayford Trust. It was formerly used as an office, but it stood unused for years.

The redevelopment proposal involves the demolition of the current building down to its foundations and raising a new two-storey structure to be used a restaurant.

The new building would be roughly twice the size of the existing one, which is one of the reasons why The Lincoln Civic Trust objected to the proposal.

In a planning report, Peter Boswell, Head of Planning Services, said: “I consider that whilst the building is larger than the existing Harbour Master’s office, it is well proportioned and its scale and mass has been fully considered in formulating a successful design.

“I consider that it is not visually intrusive but to the contrary adds quality and vibrancy to a neglected site and makes a positive contribution to the Brayford area as a whole.

“The fact the proposed building is larger than the existing structure does not mean there will automatically be harm as a result and the strong design coupled with the unique positioning of the building will create a new landmark for Lincoln.”

The building’s proposed planters onto Brayford Wharf North also caused some concern from the Highway Authority that access could be impeded.

This has been resolved by a revised planter design which makes them removable and this has satisfied the Highway Authority.

The application was first submitted in March and had to go through the planning and consultation process at the City of Lincoln Council.

Boswell recommended the City Council Planning Committee to approve the development, which initially was hoped to be finished by Christmas.

Photo: Stem Architects