Home » Leisure

Lincoln receives Purple Flag for good nights out

Flying the flag (L-R): Marion Cooney, Evening Economy Manager for Lincoln BIG, Matt Corrigan, Chief Executive of Lincoln BIG, Simon Colburn, Assistant Director for Health and Environment at the City of Lincoln Council and Sam Barstow, Acting Anti-Social Behaviour Manager at the City of Lincoln Council

Representatives from the City of Lincoln Council and Lincoln BIG joined six other towns and cities from across the UK in Bristol on Tuesday night to be officially presented with Purple Flag status for Lincoln.

The ceremony formally recognised Lincoln, alongside Sheffield, Watford, Southend, Ipswich and Aberystwyth, as a city that has an enjoyable and safe night-time economy.

As previously reported, the new Purple Flag holders join the existing 25 towns and cities that hold the status across the UK.

In order to receive the award, towns and cities are required to be welcoming to all visitors and provide a diverse mix of leisure and entertainment facilities, restaurants and bars which accommodate people of all ages.

They must also offer safe ways for visitors to travel home after a night out.

Purple Flag accredited towns and cities can expect to receive more visitors and benefit from reduced crime and anti-social behaviour levels.

City Councillor Fay Smith said: “A good amount of work has gone into achieving this accolade, with schemes including the Street Pastors, who assist people when they are on nights out, the Evening Safety Wardens, who help to deter anti-social behaviour, and the Codes of Practice, which means every business sticks to certain rules and strives to be the best.

“I’m very proud that Lincoln now has Purple Flag status – we will continue our hard work, so we can always fly our flag with pride!” she said.

Philip Kolvin QC, Chairman of the Purple Flag Board, said: “Rewarding the success of further towns and cities attaining Purple Flag status is an occasion to celebrate.

“The initiative is actively making a difference to towns and cities up and down the UK, which is hugely important for the communities who live there and for their visitors,” he added.