Lincoln University Technical College goes before city planners

Update: This application has been deferred to the August 14 Planning Committee meeting.

Plans to build a University Technical College (UTC) in Lincoln will go before the City of Lincoln Planning Committee for approval this week.

The proposals, funded by the Government’s Education Funding Agency and developed by Lincoln College, University of Lincoln and Siemens Lincoln, will see a new educational premises in the city specialising in engineering and core science for ages 14 and 19.

The UTC will use the Grade II listed Greestone Centre and Watkins Building, formerly a University of Lincoln arts campus, on Lindum Road.

In addition to reconditioning the premises already on the land though, the applicants are hoping to add another building to the rear of the Greestone Centre.

The Lincoln UTC designs by John Roberts Architects

The Lincoln UTC designs by John Roberts Architects

The new building will be part two-storey, and part three-story high, with a glazed link to the Greestone Centre.

The current workshop behind Greestone Centre will be demolished and replaced with the new build, which will add more tuition rooms and accommodation.

The lower floor on the new building will be partially dug into the hill.

Greestone Centre will be altered externally slightly, with a glazed screen to the south of the building.

Extra parking and landscaping will also be added to the area, and access to the building via Lindum Road.

Pedestrian barriers will be added along Lindum Hill to discourage drop-off on the busy road and stop people trying to cross over to Lincoln College at anywhere else but crossings.

Design: John Roberts Architects

Design: John Roberts Architects

However, the plans have been met with a number on objections from local residents, including Lord Cormack, the Lincoln Civic Trust and Sills and Betteridge Solicitors, plus a number of comments from the likes of English Heritage and Revd Canon John Patrick from Lincoln Cathedral.

Some residents and local businesses feel that the new building is not in keeping with the historical area, and that there will be access issues both during building and once students begin attending.

They also feel site is archaeologically important, and the area is not suitable for an engineering college, with a better position being somewhere like Teal Park, on the outskirts of the city.

However, the council states it has also received a number of letters in support of the application.

The report by Development Service Manager believes that the addition of a UTC to Lincoln will “provide the opportunity to develop and retain engineering and science focussed young people in the city and in wider Lincolnshire.”

Therefore, the report recommends that the Planning Committee consider granting approval of the proposal, provided a number of conditions are also met by the applicant.

These include seeing the materials which will be used on the building, highway work completed before the college opens, no access to the school from Greestone Place, a Management Scheme in place to make provision for bat roosts, and a set management plan for the construction period.

If approved, the college aims to be completed and open to its first 260 students in September 2014.

The college will be able to hold up to 640 pupils from September 2017.

Lincoln residents can view the outline plan and the designs of the building on the City of Lincoln Council website.

The plans will be put before the Planning Committee on July 17 at 5.30pm at City Hall.