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Councils’ 20-year plan for Lincoln growth contested by village residents

A 20-year development plan, dubbed the Local Plan by central Lincolnshire councils, is being met with concern by Saxilby village residents who feel areas surrounding Lincoln will be subjected to “urban sprawl”.

The plan, after three rounds of consultation, will guide the location and development of housing, jobs, shops and schools through to 2036 and is being considered by the councils covering North Kesteven, West Lindsey and the City of Lincoln.

From October 1, people can review the first draft of the plan by the Central Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Planning Committee (CLJSPC).

In Saxilby, residents opposing West Lindsey District Council’s involvement in the committee are hoping to gain support against rural development on ‘greenfield’ land.

Village residents will attend a public meeting on September 4 to discuss the impact of large housing developments in the area.

In July, 2014, a planned development of 230 new homes in Saxilby was rejected due to a lack of health and education facilities, congestion issues and threats to the “rural character” of the village.

Village resident and appeal spokesman Gordan Allen said: “The Church Lane planning application has been the catalyst to alert residents to further applications on other large Greenfield sites on the approaches to our village.

“West Lindsey is ‘partner’ with Lincoln and North Kesteven in the CLJSPU creating the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan, which will undoubtedly result in Saxilby eventually becoming an urban overspill for Lincoln.

“It will also have consequential effects in other peripheral villages around Lincoln being subject to similar large-scale housing developments.”

The CLJSPC is welcoming comments and feedback on the plan which will be available to view at each partner authority from October 1 – North Kesteven District Council, West Lindsey District Council, City of Lincoln Council and Lincolnshire County Council.

Committee Chairman Councillor Marion Brighton OBE, said: “The main principle is that the area needs to grow, but that that growth must be in the right places, at the right pace and at the right time with infrastructure developed alongside so that communities remain vibrant, sustainable and thriving.

“At this stage it does not include suggested site allocations which we know will be of great interest to people, nor precise target numbers; those will come next year and be subject to further consultation at that time.”