‘They betrayed us’: People react to Lincoln Walk-In-Centre closure

People in Lincoln said they felt betrayed by health bosses after they agreed to close the city’s walk-in-centre at the end of February.

Many readers of The Lincolnite claimed “the script was already written” as Lincolnshire West Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) defied 94% of the people opposing the closure in the official consultation.

As previously reported, the CCG’s governing body voted through the closure at a meeting at The Showroom in Lincoln on Wednesday, January 24.

Opening hours will now be reduced to weekends from the start of February, as part of a phased closure of the centre. It will close for good by the end of the month.

The controversial decision to close the walk-in-centre follows a consultation with almost 3,000 people in the Lincoln area, 94% of whom said they would not support a closure.

The Lincolnshire West CCG Governing Body agreed to close the Lincoln Walk-In-Centre at the end of February. Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

Lincolnshire West Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), which runs the service, took the decision to close the centre after the winter period, despite widespread public outcry, protests and petitions.

‘We said no, they said yes’

A number of residents and patients at the walk-in-centre aired their concerns about the centre’s upcoming closure.

Molly Wallhead said: “The script was written… and now we wait for the fallout. It is us, the public who will suffer and we pay for it! It’s our walk-in centre, it’s our NHS.

“We are the ones that actually use the service and witness first hand how essential it is. In no way can I see how the closure can be of benefit to anyone, patient or care provider alike.”

Chris Wright added: “The most ridiculous decision ever made about healthcare in Lincoln. Not all of us can afford private health care!

Christine Burton commented: “Absolutely crazy, my daughter went the other day, had to be turned away as it was too busy! I hope Lincoln A&E are going to be prepared.”

Andrew Washington said: “We said no, they said yes…”

John Staves added: “How can something that alleviates the pressure on A&E, and is in popular demand, not be given every assistance in continuing?”