Lincoln death rates ‘shocking’

The latest data on deaths and life expectancy in Lincoln is “shocking”, says the head of leading local social charity.

Life expectancy for males in the city can be as much as 11.9 years shorter, depending on what area you live in. For women the gap is 6.9 years at its largest.

Jeanne Bain, Chief Executive of Lincoln Community Development Project (LCDP), told The Lincolnite: “This is deeply worrying.

“We have been working in Lincoln since 1997 and we were aware that male life expectancy was significantly lower than the rest of the country.

“However the last figure I was given was 6 years lower, it has risen now to 11.9 years difference in the most disadvantaged areas of Lincoln–this is shocking.”

Early deaths relating to heart disease, strokes and cancer in Lincoln are higher than average for England.

For every 100,000 residents over 35-years-old, 82.5 die before the age of 75 from a stroke or heart disease, comparing with a national average of 70.5.

Cancer causes early deaths in 129 cases per 100,000 people, compared with the national average of 112.1.

Despite performing badly against the national average, the city’s early death rates have been falling at a steady pace in recent years.

Graph from the Department of Health showing steady decline in death rates of all ages and causes for Lincoln against the average rate for England.

Bain said: “We are working with Public Health to address this problem through our EPOC (Early Presentation of Cancer) programme.

“This work uses community development and social marketing to raise awareness and the importance of early presentation of signs and symptoms to GPs.

“Early diagnosis leads to much better outcomes for people affected by cancer.”

Photo: Kelly Moore for The Lincolnite