Lincoln man jailed for 30 offences against young girls

Lincoln man James Frost has been jailed for 11 years for a string of offences committed against young girls both online and in person.

James David Frost, 29, of Witham St Hughes, Lincoln, pleaded guilty to 30 offences at Lincoln Crown Court.

The offences included supplying cocaine, cannabis, ketamine, and M-Cat to a number of his victims; causing child pornography; possessing cocaine with intent to supply; inciting or causing child pornography; possessing indecent images of a child; inciting a child under 13 to engage in sexual activity; and one count of sexual activity with a child.

The court heard that Frost was aged between 25 and 28 at the time of his offending, which took place between the summer of 2011 to August 2013.

A total of 16 girls were involved – two were aged 12 and the others all between 13 to 17-years old at the time.

Frost used a number of aliases online on sites such as Facebook, Skype, Snapchat and Kick. Police say he mainly pretended to be a teenage boy and would use a mixture of flattery and insults to try and get the girls to send indecent pictures to him as well as sending pictures of himself to them.

The court heard he also met several of them in person and would supply them with drugs as a way to get them to engage in sexual behaviour.

Judge Michael Heath QC told Frost he had given him some credit for his guilty pleas. He also said the 11-year sentence in prison was due to the seriousness of his offences in which he “groomed or sought to groom them all [the victims] to varying extents.”

Speaking after the sentencing Detective Superintendent Rick Hatton, of Lincolnshire Police’s Public Protection Unit said: “The sentence today reflects the seriousness of the offences in totality.

“Frost clearly coerced, groomed and pressurised young girls to send indecent images of themselves and also provided them with a supply of drugs, which he used a as a lever for his sexual offending against these young girls.

“This has had a profound effect on the victims, some as young as 12, and the manner of his offending where he has used a variety of aliases was a very worrying feature of this case.

“It highlights the dangers of interacting online with people you don’t know. We advise people to always be safe online and not to engage with or send photos to anyone you don’t know and not to end up in a position where you feel blackmailed or pressured into taking further action.

“This has been a complex case for the investigating team, which involved some painstaking analysis of evidence, but ultimately it is about the victims themselves. I hope they can begin to move on from the traumatic experiences they were subjected to at the hands of Frost.”