350-home Welton estate approved with affordable retirement homes

Developers have been given the go-ahead to build a new 350-home estate on the edge of Welton, near Lincoln.

The land, off Prebend Lane to the north of the village, is currently agricultural fields.

In a planning meeting on March 4, West Lindsey District Council granted outline planning permission to the development, subject to conditions.

The council has said that 25% of the new properties (87) must be affordable homes.

Of these, 56 will be constructed by the applicant, Beal Homes. The remaining 31 will be affordable retirement homes provided by LACE Housing Association.

In addition, Beal Homes has submitted a Unilateral Undertaking which, subject to planning permission, would oblige them to make a significant capital contribution of £500,000 towards works to improve the A46 Centurion Garage junction.

Capital contributions of £1,161,218 and £148,750 respectively are also required to address the rise in the number of school places and added strain on health care facilities in the village that the increase in population will cause.

Further conditions include providing suitable on-site sports facilities, constructing a suitable drainage system, and protecting the local Great Crested Newt population.

The council has also proposed a full archaeological investigation as parts of the site may have rare Roman and Iron Age artefacts of historical value.

The development has not been without its detractors, with the main objections concerning the size of the development and the strain it would put on services in the village.

Sir Edward Leigh, MP for Gainsborough, said: “The development will completely change the character of Welton as well as adding an extra burden onto services, schools and shops.

“The size and scale of proposed development is completely beyond what is acceptable.”

Councillor Diana Rodgers, ward member for Welton of WLDC, added: “The application affects the open countryside, the health centre is already over-extended, the schools are over-subscribed, and the parlous road network is under-funded and over-utilised.”