Animal waste factory would have ‘devastating impact’, argue Norton Disney protestors

Around 400 people and businesses in Norton Disney turned out in force to protest plans for a new animal waste rendering plant.

The £28 million factory on Villa Farm has been proposed by Lincoln Proteins Limited, which will relocate from its current Skellingthorpe facility. The move would also create around 30 jobs.

Since early stages of the planning process, people living nearby have come together in opposition. More than 3,600 people have signed an online petition against the development.

Photo: Jasper Weldon

The march took place on December 30 from Villa Farm to Norton Disney, organised by the Witham Valley Preservation Group.

Protestors held placards with messages like “You will ruin Hill Hold Wood”, “Let’s kick up a stink before you do” and “Your facility will ruin our business”.

Photo: Jasper Weldon

They cited fears that the plant could produce similar odours to the plant in Skellingthorpe, which gained the infamous nickname ‘Smelly Skelly’.

Photo: Jasper Weldon

Photo: Jasper Weldon

Photo: Jasper Weldon

Photo: Jasper Weldon

The group said they found no benefits to the proposal and want developers to consider another site: “We believe the proposed factory will have a devastating impact on local businesses, leading to a loss of both jobs and income.

“No-one wants to stay in a B&B next to an enormous factory processing dead animals or get married in a village that stinks of rotting carcasses.

Photo: Jasper Weldon

“We do not want to see the Norton Disney junction on the A46 become a danger to drivers and an accident black-spot (or hear of any more tragic deaths).”

Protesters also say they are worried about the environmental impact of the plant, as well as the visual impact of a 25 centre chimney on the site.

Photo: Jasper Weldon

Photo: Jasper Weldon

Photo: Jasper Weldon

Gary Hancock from Lincoln Proteins Ltd (A Hughes and Son) said previously: “Since the plans were announced in October, we have met with a significant number of local people as part of the public consultation.”

The company said that foul odours are less likely than years ago due to new state-of-the-art equipment.

Gary Hancock added: “A modern processing facility is unrecognisable from the old plant of 14 years ago.

“The odours are negligible and less intrusive than average everyday agriculture. The move will enable the jobs and the multimillion pound contribution to the Lincolnshire economy to stay where it belongs, in Lincolnshire.”