Lincoln’s Iron Throne: Long awaited footbridge complete

“Stickleback”, “venus flytrap”, “Stegosaurus” and even “the gates to Mordor”: Lincoln’s new Brayford footbridge has already gained quite a reputation in the city.

After much anticipation, people can now officially climb the 96 steps over the railway line on Brayford Wharf East to avoid waiting at the barriers.

The road has also reopened northbound.

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

Work began on the multi million pound, 100 tonne spiky structure in October 2018.

After a few delays and setbacks due to ground conditions, the final opening date was late.

Network Rail, behind the project, hopes the bridge will alleviate queuing and improve safety at the crossing, used by around 16,000 pedestrians and 7,000 vehicles every day.

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

The final plans proved controversial and needed approval from the Planning Inspectorate after they were refused by the City of Lincoln Council.

Designs were downsized due to costs, meaning that original intentions for a lift were taken out.

People who cannot use the stairs will be able to use the crossing as normal.

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

Photo: Steve Smailes for The Lincolnite

The project followed the city’s £12 million footbridge over the High Street line, completed in 2016. 

There will be a link between the two crossings onto the High Street later this year.

Workers will now begin to remove a temporary floating pontoon which served as a walkway onto the university campus during the project.

Lincolnites have been sharing their views the bridge on the morning of Wednesday, May 15.

Some weren’t happy about the lack of disabled access. Maria Masterson wrote on The Lincolnite’s Facebook page: “The sparkling new bridge, designed so that able bodies don’t have to walk 50 yards.”

Ryan Rousseau asked: “Do [disabled people] still have to be late to lectures and seminars?”

Others had sympathy for those living in nearby flats which look out onto the bridge: “Not much consideration for the folks that have flats next to it”, wrote Mark Baker.

Many people on social media liked the design and welcomed the improvement for pedestrians.

Jane Rimmer said: “I think it looks interesting, and much better than the ugly one on the High Street.”