Jane Marshall

Jane Marshall

janemarshall

Jane Marshall is Director of Strategy at Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. She has worked in the NHS for 30 years in various roles and for the last seven years, when she’s been with LPFT, she has been working on ensuring that mental health is given the same importance as physical health.


It is becoming more and more recognised that taking care of our mental health is as important as maintaining good physical health. A recent survey showing that more than 8 in 10 (83%) people experienced the early signs of poor mental health, including feeling anxious, stressed, having low mood or trouble sleeping in the last 12 months.

We don’t need to wait until we are struggling with our mental health; there are lots of things we can do to protect ourselves and prevent problems escalating, just as we do with our physical health.

During the recent World Mental Health Day the Duke and Duchesses of Cambridge and Sussex, as well as a host of celebrities, launched a new national campaign to improve the nation’s mental wellbeing, under the banner Every Mind Matters.

Every Mind Matters offers a range of useful resources that help spot the signs of common mental health concerns, provides practical self-care tips and guidance and, importantly, explains when to seek further support.

There is a free NHS-approved online tool on the Every Mind Matters website, which helps people build a personalised action plan to deal with stress and anxiety, boost mood, improve sleep and help feel more in control.

What comes out strongly from this campaign, is the importance of talking to each other about our problems and seeking help where we need it.

Being open about mental health doesn’t have to be awkward and being there for someone can make a huge difference to their life. We know opening up is not always easy, but doing small things can make a big difference for a friend or family member who is struggling.

There are lots of websites nationally that provides advice on how to support someone you are worried about. Search for resources on the Time to Change website for advice and guidance. I have also recently undertaken the free online suicide awareness training by Zero Suicide Alliance, which helps me feel more confident in approaching conversations with someone I know who may not be coping.

We also have a broad range of mental health and wellbeing services in Lincolnshire, ranging from short term talking therapies via our steps2change service, to our more specialised support for serious and long term mental health problems.

Services across Lincolnshire are also set to expand further thanks to new national funding to transform local community mental health services. Lincolnshire is set to benefit from around £6 million over the next two years, as one of 12 early implementer sites nationally.

In addition to changes in how we deliver community services more closely linked with neighbourhood teams, there will also be a number of other new services including a new mental health helpline, specialised support for people with a personality disorder, community rehabilitation, specialist mental health outreach for rough sleepers and an increased crisis response.

There is lots of support available for anyone concerned about their mental health, visit www.lpft.nhs.uk for more information.

Jane Marshall is Director of Strategy at Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. She has worked in the NHS for 30 years in various roles and for the last seven years, when she’s been with LPFT, she has been working on ensuring that mental health is given the same importance as physical health.

As the NHS celebrated its 70th birthday this year I am sure we all thought about how important the NHS is to us.

I am proud to work at Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and I feel privileged to work in mental health and learning disability services. Over the last few years, we have listened to our staff and responded to what they want us to do to improve their working lives as they care for others.

We also listen to our patients and their carers about what is important to them and their loved ones. We have made some important changes to improve the services we offer to patients in Lincolnshire.

Nothing instills hope more than talking to someone who has been through similar circumstances. Our 17 peer support workers have been through difficulties with their mental health and are employed by us to make a difference; using their personal experience of living with mental health problems to help others.

Having a job is a life-preserving and enhancing thing. I was reminded of this when our learning disability experts by experience received their induction in 2018. These experts help us to be even better at what we do and they were so excited! I will never forget the looks on their faces as they received their badges and lanyards.

This year LPFT has been lucky to get funding to introduce new services which support people at their most vulnerable, reducing the need for long stays in hospital and keeping them safe, with support, close to where they live.

Working together our teams have supported over 300 people to receive care without the need for admission to a mental health ward. Previously some of these people would have to travel long distances away from their homes to get the care they needed.  

We can all improve understanding of mental health problems and I’d encourage everyone to become Dementia Friends and do your training with the Alzheimer’s Society (my mum did it, and you can too). Dementia is likely to affect everyone’s life at some point. Whether it’s your parent, your partner or your friend who lives with dementia, by becoming a Dementia Friend you can learn more about the condition and the ways you can help.

Similarly please consider doing your online suicide prevention training this year.  It is available to anyone who wants to help people to talk about how they are feeling and a conversation could save a life.

I’m looking forward to continuing to develop our services in 2019, working with patients and partners to reduce the stigma associated with mental health conditions. The NHS is one of our greatest achievements as a nation.

But there is much more we need to do – building capacity in our communities in Lincolnshire; supporting the great work that is going on to support people who are homeless or rough sleeping; supporting young people with their wellbeing and supporting everyone to live well and to be resilient.  

When I think about the NHS I am moved by the compassion and dedication of our staff who consistently put their patients first, and I am sure you will want to join me in thanking all of them for what they do. 

Jane Marshall is Director of Strategy at Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. She has worked in the NHS for 30 years in various roles and for the last seven years, when she’s been with LPFT, she has been working on ensuring that mental health is given the same importance as physical health.

In the long dark days of winter looking after your mental wellbeing is as important as looking after your physical health.

This Self Care Week is an opportunity to ask ourselves, could I do more to look after my own mental wellbeing? Please take a few moments to look through some of the ideas here and see if there is anything you would like to try.

Be sleep aware research suggests that we ideally need seven and a half to eight hours sleep every night. There are top tips available on the Sleep Council website.

Think about a spot of mindfulness and relaxation. There are many ways to be mindful and take a moment or two out of your busy day to reflect and be aware of how you feel in your mind and body. Relaxation techniques and mindfulness are great ways to reduce your stress levels, reduce your anxiety and improve your low mood. Try one of the free mindfulness podcasts which are available online from steps2change SoundCloud channel, or visit the website for more information.

Do something amazing and give something back. We are looking for people who want to be part of our organisation by providing the most precious commodity – their time. We have a range of opportunities available and some fantastic volunteers who work with us now and help us do what we do. Small acts of kindness toward others such as volunteering can give you a sense of purpose and can make you feel happier and more satisfied with life. Please consider applying to be a volunteer, whatever the amount of time you can give. Apply to be an LPFT volunteer.

Getting active and social can be great for your physical health and fitness, and evidence shows that it can also improve your mental wellbeing. Lincolnshire’s Managed Care Network is a collection of community groups which offers support through various activities to help people recovering from mental ill health, or those living with dementia. It offers a wide variety of activities and groups ranging from local social and friendship groups, sporting and other outdoor physical activities, through to creative therapy and support for carers. Read more about the Managed Care Network.

Learn how to become an expert in self care through our Recovery College. The college uses an educational based approach. This can enable people to recognise and develop their personal resourcefulness in order to become experts in their self care, make informed choices and do the things they want to in life. The college offers free courses to anyone who wants to know more about mental health, whether they are a service user, carer, professional or just someone interested in learning more. Find out more, or download a prospectus.

Under 19 and looking for emotional wellbeing support? Go to www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/ewb which is a first step to accessing information and advice about emotional wellbeing. There’s also our Healthy Minds service for young people. Evidence tells us that early help when issues arise prevents mental health problems arising in the future. We can help young people with a range of emotional wellbeing concerns eg exam stress, worries, low mood, low body image, self-harm, relationship difficulties, low self-confidence.

Get involved in talking about mental health. We are running a series of workshops on mental health in partnership with our colleagues in the SHINE network. We cover the whole of Lincolnshire and could be coming to a town near you, find out more on the website.

We know that empowering people and giving them the tools to look after their own mental and physical health can be imperative for stability and recovery. Every winter we hear a lot about flu jabs and colds but please don’t forget about your mental health.

You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook for hints and tips on mental wellbeing, or visit our website to see more ways that LPFT can help.

Jane Marshall is Director of Strategy at Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. She has worked in the NHS for 30 years in various roles and for the last seven years, when she’s been with LPFT, she has been working on ensuring that mental health is given the same importance as physical health.