Red Arrows

The Red Arrows have released a behind-the-scenes video showing how the team got on in Greece for their yearly training mission, featuring support from a range of units and bases.

The Red Arrows are currently on a five-week pre-season training exercise in Greece known as Springhawk.

The aim of Exercise Springhawk is to “perfect, polish and prepare a world-class, dynamic and safe show”. Greece’s fine weather allows for up to three flights a day.

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team also showcased an impressive huge team loop, which is part of their new arrival manoeuvre for their 2021 shows.

The annual overseas training allows the Red Arrows to take advantage of more settled weather conditions, with a high-tempo of flying.

An impressive huge team loop, part of the Red Arrows’ new arrival manoeuvre for their 2021 shows, was captured in a stunning video during a training exercise in Greece.

The Red Arrows have completed the first week of a five-week pre-season training exercise in Greece known as Springhawk.

The aim of Exercise Springhawk is to “perfect, polish and prepare a world-class, dynamic and safe show”.

A new video shows Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team flying over the airfield they are using in Greece to begin a new display.

Pulling up, all nine Hawk jets climb in the skies. As they climb, the aircraft move closer together and the team performs a huge loop.

This impressive move is the Red Arrows’ arrival manoeuvre for their new 2021 show.

The annual overseas training allows the Red Arrows to take advantage of more settled weather conditions, with a high-tempo of flying.

The Red Arrows said they are grateful for the substantial support and cooperation given by the British Embassy in Athens, the Hellenic Air Force and Greek authorities.

Meanwhile, members of the Red Arrows team in Greece observed a one-minute silence on April 17, to pay respects to His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip.

The Red Arrows have flown back to RAF Scampton after being grounded on Thursday due to a Royal Navy jet crash in Cornwall.

All Hawk T1 activity was paused as a precautionary measure after the jet crash, in which it is believed an engine failure forced two pilots to eject from the aircraft based at RNAS Culdrose.

Two pilots were airlifted to hospital and are in a stable condition without suffering significant injury. It’s believed this was due to an engine failure.

The crash, which was the first ejection from a Royal Navy aircraft in 18 years, caused the Reds to be temporarily grounded, but they have now returned to Lincolnshire after being cleared to fly again.

Following numerous safety assessments of the wider fleet, the chain of command at the RAF allowed for Hawk T1 aircraft to take to the skies again, but confirmed that investigations into the incident are still ongoing.

The RAF has said that it will be “inappropriate to comment on the nature of this advice” as it could prejudice the inquiry that is currently taking place, but “safety is always our priority.”

Earlier this week the Reds had their first practice flight in a 9-formation.

+ More stories