February 12, 2020 12.24 pm This story is over

Storm Dennis warning extended for whole weekend

Brace yourselves for strong winds

The Met Office has extended its yellow weather warning for severe wind across Saturday and Sunday as Storm Dennis heads for the UK.

The yellow warning for wind was initially due to be in place between midday and midnight on Saturday, February 15. However, it has now been extended to start at 10am on Saturday and stay in place until midnight on Sunday, February 16.

The Met Office previously said it is not expected to be as extreme as Storm Ciara, but Dennis will bring widespread strong winds and heavy rain to parts of the UK.

The Met Office has issued the following guidance of what to expect:

  • Some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport are likely and there is a chance that some roads and bridges could close.
  • Some coastal routes, sea fronts and coastal communities are likely to be affected by spray and/or large waves
  • There is a slight chance of some damage to buildings, such as tiles blown from roofs
  • There is a slight chance that power cuts may occur, with the potential to affect other services, such as mobile phone coverage

The strongest winds across many parts of England and Wales are likely to be on Saturday afternoon and evening, with a lull overnight, before increasing again during Sunday.

Gusts of 50mph are expected widely inland. Around the coasts, especially in the west and south, gusts of 60-70mph are likely. In Lincoln, gusts are expected to reach a maximum of 48mph on Saturday afternoon. The strong winds will be accompanied by heavy rain at times, leading to particularly poor driving conditions.

Homes, businesses including the Lincolnshire Co-op foodstore in Witham St Hughs, and a 176-year-old windmill suffered in the grip of Storm Ciara last week. Fallen trees and debris also caused a chain of road closures.

Lincoln weekend weather forecast

Lincoln weather forecast for Saturday, February 15. Photo: Met Office

Lincoln weather forecast for Sunday, February 16. Photo: Met Office

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