Norton Disney rendering plant resubmitted, with new visitor and heritage plans

Developers behind a refused £28 million animal rendering plant in Norton Disney have announced plans to resubmit the proposals with a new heritage site.

The controversial plan was lodged by Lincoln Proteins Ltd for a site at Villa Farm and would have seen the firm move from its Skellingthorpe factory.

But Lincolnshire County Council’s planning committee unanimously refused the plan in February following concerns over heritage and location.

There were fears the facility would “overshadow” the Lancaster Bomber gateway sculpture being built off the A46.

The latest plans for the site include a new heritage centre overlooking the proposed Bomber Command sculpture.

The new heritage site will be included to the south of the development.

Operations manager Alan Asker said: “We are pleased and excited to unveil our improved design which takes into consideration the heritage aspects of recent public opinion, we are looking forward to obtaining their views through further consultation.”

When the plans were originally submitted there was objection from both local residents and North Kesteven District Council over odour and location.

The county council received 1,105 letters of objection.

Protestors at an event staged against the plans. Photo: Jasper Weldon

However, the developers said they had made “extensive improvements”.

According to the new plans the site will include a picnic area, children’s play area, a butterfly garden and a refreshments kiosk.

The developers said it will be in an elevated position and offer views overlooking the sculpture.

The design for the Bomber sculpture, under construction off the A46, which the new heritage centre would overlook.

There is also a plan for a Roman villa viewing area for visitors to see discoveries made during an archeological dig, including an information board, website link and “the potential for augmented reality viewing.

Norton Disney residents in the public gallery at Lincolnshire County Council’s planning meeting where the £28 million animal rendering plant in the village was refused.

Further changes will see widened access roads, a reduction in the size of the plant and height of its flue, and a reduction in the area of mineral resources that would be sterilised, said the applicants.

The developers said they had clarified during the previous meeting that there would be no odour, air pollution, noise or transportation issues.

“These were obviously the main concerns of the county council when the application was first submitted and they are content that we have demonstrated that these are well within all acceptable limits,” said Mr Asker.

Further consultation is set to take place later this year before the plans are resubmitted to the county council.

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